• Standards describe what a student should know and be able to do at each grade level in all subjects, and the report
    card gives parents more detailed information about how their children are progressing. The purpose of a standards
    based report card is for a teacher to accurately communicate a student’s progress towards meeting content
    standards at specific points in the school year.


    The report card indicates to parents specifics about how their children are progressing toward mastering grade level
    content. Parents will know whether or not their child is:

    • Mastering Grade Level Standard — the child has mastered the grade‐level standard,
    • Progressing Toward Mastery of Grade Level Standard — the child is approaching or progressing toward mastery of
      the grade‐level standard, or
    • Not Mastering Grade Level Standard — the child has not yet mastered the standard.
    •  Blank—not yet assessed; however, all grade level standards will be assessed by the end of the school year.

     

    Teachers, students and parents can clearly understand which standards have been mastered and which need more
    and practice to effectively master. Skills in English Language Arts (ELA), Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies
    that are marked progressing indicate a student is working on the skill but has not yet completely mastered it. While
    students learn at different rates, all standards should be mastered by the end of the school year.
    The report card also provides information concerning student work habits, conduct, and attendance.

     

    Parent/Teacher Conversations
    Parents are encouraged to ask their teachers questions. Examples include:

    •  If my child is progressing through a standard, how can I help him/her stay on track to achieve mastery of the
      standard?
    • If my child is not mastering a standard, how can I help him/her improve so he/she is progressing toward mastery
      of the standard?
    • What is my child’s greatest strength?
    • In which areas/skills does my child need additional work?
    • How is my child showing progress with the standards?
    • What behaviors are affecting learning positively? What behaviors need additional support?
    • What strategies could we use at home to support student success?


    Parent/Student Conversations
    Parents are encouraged to ask their children questions about their learning. Examples include:

    • What are you best at in school?
    • What skills are more difficult for you?
    • What behaviors affect your learning in school?
    • What can I do to help you be successful?

Resources